Do you know which is the best and most famous car-chase scene of all time? No? It’s a 9 minute and 42-second drive through the hilly streets in and around San Francisco from the movie Bullitt. It includes Steve McQueen in 1968 Ford Mustang GT390 and two killers in a black Dodge Charger.

This replica of the 1968 Mustang Fastback GT 390 that co-starred with Steve McQueen in the movie Bullitt retraces some of the original San Francisco streets from the movie's chase scene.


Ford Mustang was introduced on April 17, 1964, at the New York World’s Fair and was stylish, elegant and affordable car. Ford estimated that they would sell around 80,000 Mustangs in its first year, but it sold more than a million in its first two years.

In 1968 when Bullitt premiered, the National Observer wrote in their review, “Whatever you have heard about the auto chase scene in Bullitt is probably true…a terrifying, deafening shocker.” Bullitt certainly made history with the car-chase. The chase is intense and brilliantly executed. After all these years it still feels good when watching it.

In 2001, Ford offered a special version of its GT with the Bullitt nameplate and sold a total 5,582 cars. In 2007 they revealed a new version. Engineers modeled the car’s exhaust note on the engine sound heard in the original movie, based on a specially mastered DVD. To make it even more desirable, Ford decided to produce only 7,700 units (even though there were reports of 3,000 additional units due to the high demand).

Anyway, Ford Mustang (Bullitt edition) remains one of the most remarkable cars that was made in the last 50 years – also because of Hollywood’s touch. Ford’s website states that Ford Mustang has appeared in more than 500 movies and hundreds of television programs since it was introduced in 1964. Some of the most memorable movies that included Mustang: James Bond’s Goldfinger and Diamonds are Forever, Gone in Sixty Seconds (1974 and 2000 version), True Crime, I Am Legend …

I believe that for many movie lovers seeing Ford Mustang on a big screen causes the “I want to have this car” effect. And that’s precisely what all marketers are trying to do. All the time.